What will be covered in my will?

A will is an important legal document which describes your wishes for what you would like to happen to your estate (everything you own) after your death. Being absolutely clear about who you want to benefit when you die will not only remove any doubt and help avoid family disputes, but also help your loved ones sort out your affairs at what will be a difficult time for them. First things first A good starting point for what and who you might want to include in your will is to consider the following questions: What do you own? Properties, vehicles, savings and investments, jewellery, antiques, furniture, clothes, personal belongings, pets…the list goes on. What do you owe? Mortgage, credit cards, loans, equity release, etc. Do you have children under 18? If so, you may want to think about appointing guardians for them. Who do you want to benefit from your will? Your partner, children, special friends or neighbours, charities, etc. Do you have any other special requests? Organ donation or funeral arrangements are things many choose to include. Who do you want to appoint as your executors? The types of gifts you can leave in your will Guardians and Executors If your children are under 18 you will need to choose someone to appoint as their legal guardian. You will also need to appoint executors. These are the people who will be responsible for making sure the instructions in your will are carried out properly and you appoint them in the legal document. It’s true, knowing what to include in your will can seem daunting, but it’s not. We’ve...

Is property that I own overseas covered by my will?

With Affio, you can specify that you want your will to cover your assets in the UK, or your assets throughout the world. If your assets are situated outside of England and Wales, or if you are domiciled outside England and Wales, then the applicable law where the assets are situated, or the the law of your domicile may affect the way your will operates. If you’re concerned about this, you may want to consider getting legal advice or making a second will in the country where you own the property. Back to the knowledge...